fasterthanthespeedforce:

Wherein Black Canary gets her happy ending



mroliver-green:

El unico team de Oliver es Dinah , ella es la unica persona que se banca a Oliver como es , sacando tal vez Hal , ni Speddy ni Arsenal Ni Connor han podido estar demasiado tiempo junto a Green Arrow por su caracter , la unica que logra siempre estar al lado de Oliver Queen es Dinah Laurel Lance. Y eso que es a la persona que mas ha lastimado pero es la unica persona a la que puede amar mas que a él mismo y es por eso que siempre terminan juntos asi sea en un universo totalmente alterno al mundo …

mroliver-green:

El unico team de Oliver es Dinah , ella es la unica persona que se banca a Oliver como es , sacando tal vez Hal , ni Speddy ni Arsenal Ni Connor han podido estar demasiado tiempo junto a Green Arrow por su caracter , la unica que logra siempre estar al lado de Oliver Queen es Dinah Laurel Lance. Y eso que es a la persona que mas ha lastimado pero es la unica persona a la que puede amar mas que a él mismo y es por eso que siempre terminan juntos asi sea en un universo totalmente alterno al mundo …



#FallForUs: Samira Wiley for Aritzia

1 hour ago · 16 notes (© dianaberrigan)


1 day ago · 49 notes (© booasaur)

medicalschool:

In the past few years, next-generation cancer drugs have started trickling into the clinics, including a smart inhibitor that block a specific mutant kinase (V600E-B-RAF) and antibodies that can induce T cell-mediated rejection of certain tumors (anti-CTL4 antibodies). Another promising approach is to genetically modify T cells to attack tumors and then infuse the cells into cancer patients. Indeed, this strategy is currently entering clinical trials, specifically with T cells engineered to express the chimeric antigen receptors (CARs).


1 day ago · 146 notes (© medicalschool)

visitheworld:

Iguazu Beauty / Argentina (by maryannenelson).

visitheworld:

Iguazu Beauty / Argentina (by maryannenelson).


1 day ago · 214 notes (© visitheworld)

(Source: poyzn, via redhester)


1 day ago · 158,238 notes (© poyzn)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Women’s Work: Reimagining “Blue-Collar”

26 images of tenacious, strong female loggers, welders, firefighters, miners and so forth challenging the idea of what we consider “women’s work.”

(via girlsempowergirls)


1 day ago · 6,375 notes (© stuffmomnevertoldyou)

pinkconcreterose:

That is all.

pinkconcreterose:

That is all.


1 day ago · 7 notes (© pinkconcreterose)

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land
[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]
Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.
“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”
Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.
When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.
“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”
The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.
Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.
Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land

[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]

Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.

“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”

Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.

When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.

“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”

The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.

Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.


1 day ago · 535 notes (© nativenews)